Credit Card Processing Blog
Why Should You Be PCI Compliant?

Nov 27, 2015 10:00 AM / by Reliance Star

PCI DSS is an acronym which stands for The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard. It is a set of policies to enhance the security of all transactions. Merchants who are in compliance help protect cardholders from misuse of their personal information.
 
PCI compliance represents your agreement to keep your systems secured in all ways possible. This is to show your business can be trusted with sensitive information. Once trusted, customers will confidently do business with you, visit more, and promote you.  Also, you enhance your reputation to important onlookers such as different payment brands. These are people you want to work with. 
 
 
With constant changes happening in the industry, compliance is ongoing. You are required to renew after a certain period of time. This guides you for the present and future by staying ahead of the threats. The PCI Security Standards Council is continually researching, monitoring, and dealing with security breaches. This is why ongoing compliance is required because the standards can change at any time. Through this, you can learn that things you did not even know are possible can happen to your business. 
 
 
Though you are not forced, not complying can have negative effects. It would be easier for data compromise to happen, negatively affecting your customers and you. These breaches can result in loss of sales, customer relationships, and your reputation as a business owner. Severe cases can lead to loss of potential business, lawsuits, fines, insurance claims, and more.
 
 
Owning a business isn’t a piece of cake. You want your business to prosper which requires you to work hard. The last thing you’d need is to face a security incident, which can ruin progress. Always make sure to secure your success by securing all necessary sensitive information. Remember, by doing business with you, customers are demonstrating their trust in you. Make sure they do not regret it by sticking to the PCI Security Standards. 

Topics: PCI